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Showing posts from October 26, 2012

Gravis Public Opinion Poll Shows Romney Leads Obama in North Carolina

.The October 24, 2012 poll geared to likely North Carolina voters showed an 8-percentage-point lead by Governor Romney over President Barack Obama, 53 to 45 percent. The margin of error is +/-2.4 percent. North Carolina has 15 electoral votes in play. Male voters are the reason the North Carolina vote survey went to Governor Romney. With male voters, Governor Romney leads President Obama by 17 percent, 57 to 40 percent. Females voters are split in half; 49 percent for each candidate. Fifty-two percent of North Carolina voters, survey results showed, are dissatisfied with President Obama’s past four years in office. Only 43 percent are satisfied with the President’s performance in the White House. Fifty-one percent of North Carolina voters believe the country, under the Obama Administration, is headed in the wrong direction. Only 42 percent agree with the direction the country is going.

How Important is Nevada?

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How Important is Nevada? With six electoral votes up for grabs in the state of Nevada, both President Obama and Mitt Romney are looking to persuade voters to choose switch sides, or for the undecided voters, make up their minds. According to the most recent survey of 955 Nevada residents who are likely to vote on Election Day, Gravis Marketing has found that the President has a very slight edge over Romney, with nearly 50 percent of respondents saying that they will vote for Obama and about 49 percent planning to vote for Romney. That leaves approximately 2 percent of voters undecided, as numbers have been rounded to the nearest whole.

Gravis Marketing North Carolina Public Opinion Poll

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Results from North Carolina Likely Voter Survey Gravis Public Opinion Poll Methodology Gravis Marketing conducted an automated survey of 1723 likely voters in North Carolina October 24, 2012. The margin of error for the survey is +/-2.4% and higher for subgroups.   Results shown by gender and party represent those respondents within those subgroups. All numbers shown in the tables represent percentages rounded to the nearest whole percentage. The questions were asked in the order of the question numbers which appear in this report.  Results only include respondents who answered that they were registered voters, somewhat likely, likely, or very likely to vote. The statistical methodology comprised weighing various groups for anticipated voting proportions, by using census data and voter turnout models from previous elections. The poll was conducted on behalf of Gravis Marketing, Inc., Gravis Marketing is a non-partisan marketing and research firm lo

Gravis Marketing Nevada Presidential Poll

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Gravis Public Opinion Poll Results from Nevada Likely Voter Survey www.gravispolls.com Methodology Gravis Marketing conducted an automated survey of 955 likely voters in Nevada October 24, 2012. The margin of error for the survey is +/-3.2% and higher for subgroups.   Results shown by gender and party represent those respondents within those subgroups. All numbers shown in the tables represent percentages rounded to the nearest whole percentage. The questions were asked in the order of the question numbers which appear in this report.  Results only include respondents who answered that they were registered voters, somewhat likely, likely, or very likely to vote. The statistical methodology comprised weighing various groups for anticipated voting proportions, by using census data and voter turnout models from previous elections. The poll was conducted on behalf of Gravis Marketing, Inc., Gravis Marketing is a non-partisan marketing and research firm

Iowa Public Opinion Poll Shows Obama and Romney....

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www.gravispolls.com Iowa Public Opinion Poll Results from Iowa Likely Voter Survey Methodology Gravis Marketing conducted an automated survey of 517 likely voters in Iowa October 24, 2012. The margin of error for the survey is +/-4.3% and higher for subgroups.   Results shown by gender and party represent those respondents within those subgroups. All numbers shown in the tables represent percentages rounded to the nearest whole percentage. The questions were asked in the order of the question numbers which appear in this report.  Results only include respondents who answered that they were registered voters, somewhat likely, likely, or very likely to vote. The statistical methodology comprised weighing various groups for anticipated voting proportions, by using census data and voter turnout models from previous elections. The poll was conducted on behalf of Gravis Marketing, Inc., Gravis Marketing is a non-partisan marketing and research firm loc